Monday, April 11, 2016

Cured Duck Egg Yolks

Cured Duck Egg Yolks
I was at the indoor Winter Burlington Farmer’s Market a few weeks ago and passed by the Flatlander Farm booth.

I spied duck eggs!

Back in the day (nearly 30 years ago), I tried to buy a dozen at the local co-op - but the clerk whispered, “You really don’t want those” - saying they were gamey and only good for baking.

I regretted not making that purchase, but here came my second chance!

I cracked one open.  The whites were crystal clear and the yolks were double the size of a chicken’s.

We ate them softly scrambled. They tasted similar to our own yard-bird eggs.

Before we finished off the lot I wanted to try curing some yolks, a recipe I had read about online. 

A plus: no special equipment or ingredients were required.

The finished result was salty at first, giving way to a savory eggy flavor with a waxy, creamy texture. 

I think I would have preferred them a bit softer because I loved the ooey-gooey centers with bread and cheese. 

Finished Cured Egg Yolks
 SALT-CURED EGG YOLK
Adapted from a recipe by Hank Shaw of Hunter/Angler/Gardener/Cook
Garnishes 10 plates or more.

Ingredients

2 Duck Egg Yolks
1/2 cup + of Kosher Flake Salt
Vermont Cranberry Company Vinegar

Method

Layer half of the salt in a small container such as a ½-pint canning jar.
 
Curing Egg Yolks
Gently place each yolk on top of the salt bed and cover with the rest of the salt, making sure they are completely covered. Add more if necessary.

Refrigerate for 4 -7 days.  They should be firm to the touch.

Remove from the salt and rinse in vinegar. Place on a rack over a drip tray and allow them to dry in the refrigerator for another 5-7 days.
 
Rinsed Cured Yolks
Keep finished yolks for a week in a container under refrigeration.

To serve, remove the outer rind with a vegetable peeler and slice or grate as you would cheese.



Monday, March 7, 2016

Fried Perch

 
Fresh Local Fried Perch
Personal references to the ice:

* It’s what I scrape off my car in order to get inside it.

* It’s what I slipped on in a parking lot (to the amusement of no one).

* It’s the icicle I licked on a dare, when I was 6-years old.

* It’s not where I fish.

I prefer the land and the warm, thank you very much - so, I’m appreciative when my ice-fishing friends are generous with the bounty.

I’ve enjoyed eating local smelt, walleye, trout - and most recently, perch (my husband Dan’s favorite).

Coincidentally, on that particular day, I was about to kick the latest “old” kitchen stove to the curb. 

“Bye-bye” to the sprung oven door that couldn’t shut unless braced with a bit of wood, and “Adios” to the one working burner.

I fried up a pot full of crispy fish.

It was sweet to have no pressing need to clean up the stovetop spatter afterward.

The whole fishy-smelly kit and kaboodle was pushed out the door to make room for new stove #4.

(I’ve been told I’m rough on cooking appliances, it’s not an exaggeration).

Note: this recipe was made gluten-free with Citizen Cider as the “beer” in the batter, and Maninis all-purpose flour mix, which contains sugar.


Frying Perch



Gluten-free Perch Fry
Adapted from a recipe by Emeril Lagasse

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

1 Cup Maninis Gluten Free Flour
1/2 Cup Cornstarch
1 TB Old Bay Seasoning
1 TB Baking Powder
2 Farm Fresh Eggs
Citizen Cider Unified Press

1 LB Skinless Perch Filets

Peanut Oil, for frying

Directions

Combine the first 4 ingredients in a bowl.

Whisk in eggs and enough hard cider to create a thin batter.

Add filets.  Refrigerate 30 minutes to 1 hour.
Gluten-free Batter
Preheat 2-inches of oil in a high-sided Dutch oven to 375f.

Allow excess batter to drip off each fish prior to adding to the oil.

Fry four or five at a time until browned.  Do not crowd the pan.

Allow oil to come back to temperature before continuing with remaining filets.

Remove fish to a paper-towel lined plate and season with salt, to taste.
 
First Batch of Fried Perch